Tenancy Forms And Fact Sheets For Prospective Applicants

Each Australian state and territory has a number of standardised tenancy forms and fact sheets that will enable you to easily manage your private rental properties.

To start a tenancy, you will require an inspection sheet in order to catalogue any pre-existing wear and tear on the property, plus lease agreements that adhere to state-specific regulations including:

  • Fixed-term lease agreements
  • Periodic lease agreements
  • Short fixed-term lease agreements

A bond lodgement form is also essential to help ensure you follow the correct procedures and are able to claim any monies in the event your property's damaged beyond general wear and tear during the tenancy.

Once the tenant has moved into the property, as landlord you will be required to notify them in writing of any changes to the lease or intention to enter the premises. For these occurrences you may wish to utilise standardised lease forms available though your relevant Government Department in your State to minimise the risk of unwittingly invalidating your tenant's rental agreement. Where possible, the landlord should agree with the tenant a mutually convenient time to enter the premises. The forms typically include:

  • Enter premises notification
  • Landlord to remedy breach of agreement notification
  • Tenant to remedy breach of agreement notification
  • Lease extension notification
  • Request for assistance

There are tenancy forms to end both fixed-term agreements and periodic agreements. A tenant is not typically permitted to submit an end of fixed-term agreement form until the full term is completed unless you as landlord consent to them vacating and waive liability.

Relevant State and Territory Government websites typically list miscellaneous forms for every occasion - so there's little-to-no need for you or your tenant to create a bespoke document.  

  

General Disclaimer

The information contained in TenancyCheck.com.au website is general information only and does not constitute legal, financial or compliance advice. As the laws relating to tenancy agreements may have changed we recommend you check with the relevant State or Territory government department. We also recommend that you obtain your own independent legal advice about matters relating to landlord obligations, tenant rights and any legal disputes you may have with a tenant(s).